Michigan 2018 Wrap-up

Almost as fast as it began, our late summer in Michigan has come to an end.  The last few weeks were a flurry of activity, work, and fun!  Check it out:

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My sister Judy and brother-in-law Dale came to visit.  They went on a hike with us to Pyramid Point and checked out the maritime museums at Sleeping Bear.  We finished up the day with dinner at Art’s Tavern in Glen Arbor.  It sure was good to see them!

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We also had a visit from my cousin Sue and her hubby John.  Its always fun to hang out with these two!  We caught a sunset with them at the Lake Michigan Overlook and a late dinner at Cherry Republic.

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Diana’s cousin Nancy and her husband David also stopped by, as did Nancy’s brothers Jerry and Reed.  After that, we saw our friends John and Julie, and then Diana’s cousins Evelyn, Linda and Brenda were in town.  We also were able to see our friends Camilla, Lane, Patti, Rod, Mary, George and Grace again.  Hope I didn’t miss anyone!

While at the National Lakeshore, we were encouraged to visit as much of the park as possible.  By doing so, we were able to give accurate information to our guests in the visitor center.  While out checking Good Harbor Beach, Diana spotted this cloud pattern, which is pretty typical over the peninsula.

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All that water makes for a dynamic sky.  🙂

The end of the season saw our maritime museum receive a fresh coat of paint.

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It was a tedious project, as there was lead paint that had to be removed. They really did a nice job!

We also were able to take a tour of Glen Haven with our supervisor, Marie.

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Here she is explaining the construction of the Sleeping Bear Inn.  The hotel was built in 1857, and the park is hoping to have it restored and put back into use.  Marie is a wealth of knowledge and a joy to be around.  🙂

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And here is one of the longtime residents, Leonard Thoreson, filling visitors in on the area history.  His parents owned one of the farms that is now part of the Port Oneida Rural Historic District.  Leonard can be seen riding his bike through the park just about daily.  The white plate on the front of his bike says “91”, which refers to is age.  What a treasure.

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One really fun thing we did was to work at the big relief map at the visitor center.  Here’s Diana explaining the park’s features to our guests.  It’s neat to learn about people’s interests, and match them up with what the park has to offer. People were really appreciative of our efforts.

Soon it was time to leave.

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We didn’t get a photo of Judy and Paul or of Bob and MaryJo, but we did get one of Rick and Debbie!  We sure enjoyed sharing our little campground with all these folks!

From Leelanau, we headed to Grand Rapids for a week.  While there, we were able to buzz down to Indiana to see my aunt and uncle again.  Both are doing well.  We also took care of annual physicals and such, finishing up the week in Kalamazoo for Western Michigan University’s homecoming.

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The weather wasn’t the greatest, but the rain held off for the game.  Western beat Eastern Michigan 27-24, so that added to the fun!

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We had quite the crew, first and second generation Broncos!  Brian and Sarah (olive and black shirts in the center) are getting married in a few weeks, and circumstance doesn’t allow for the group to attend, so….

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…we held a Bronco wedding!  Sarah was the Broncette and Brian was the Bronco.

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Brian’s brother Eric was the ring bearer, and he had us in stitches.   We had a reception, cake, dancing…you name it, we did it.  Diana and I even won the anniversary dance for a change! The entire event was way beyond what any of us thought it would be.  Man, we have fun when we get together!

From there, we headed to southeast Michigan to see Diana’s family.

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From left, our nephew Jared, Diana’s sister Cheryl, Dan and Becky (our niece), Diana’s brother-in-law Doug, Diana and I.  We had a great time catching up with everyone!

From there, we visited Diana’s uncle Bob and cousin Debbie.  While we were there, we camped in Diana’s hometown, Ortonville…just across the street from where we were married 36 years ago.  It was fun to be back there.  🙂

This morning, we headed south out of Michigan.  We are keeping a close eye on Hurricane Michael, as it is crossing our path to Florida.  It will be long gone by the time we get to Georgia, but we don’t know what sort of damage we are going to find.  The next few days should be interesting.

Until next time, safe and happy travels to all!

 

 

Shipwrecks and Lifesaving on the Manitou Passage

One of the consistent statements we hear from visitors to Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore is that Lake Michigan’s Manitou Passage looks like the Caribbean.  When the sun shines on these crystal clear waters, the deep blue and turquoise colors are breathtaking.

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Peaceful scenes such as the 1000 foot freighter American Spirit steaming past the North Manitou Shoal Lighthouse in the distance are common here in Leelanau County.  Looking at this, it’s difficult to imagine the fury the lake can unleash…often within a matter of minutes.  Many a mariner has been caught unaware in these waters, and their ships have been wrecked near these shores.

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This chart shows the ideal route that ships aim for as a dotted line.  By going this direction a vessel can shave 60 miles off of their trip between Mackinac and Chicago, as opposed to going west of the islands.  This archipelago can also act as protection from strong westerly winds.  During a fierce gale in 1913, the steamer Illinois found refuge in South Manitou Island’s crescent-shaped harbor by nosing into the beach and keeping the engines running forward for 50 continuous hours.  It was at that point that the wind subsided enough for a crewman to go ashore and secure the ship to a large tree, so they could power down the ship.

Back in late 1800’s and early 1900’s, there weren’t any decent roads in northern Michigan and the lakes were considered a highway.  It wasn’t unusual for 100 vessels to be in the Manitou Passage on a given day, as it was also a major fueling station.  Wood was the fuel of choice back then for steamships, and these shores had plenty of it.  All of that traffic, combined with the occasional storm, brought about many shipwrecks. Over 100 vessels were known to have run aground, with many of them being refloated and saved.

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Over 50 were left in place to be dismantled by the power of Lake Michigan’s waves.

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One such ship was the Walter L. Frost, which ran aground along South Manitou Island’s shore in 1903.  It wasn’t too many years until nothing remained above the lake’s surface.

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In 1960, the Liberian freighter Francisco Morazan grounded on South Manitou Island after losing power, running over the subsurface remains of the Frost (blue arrow) in the process.

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Today, the remains of the Morazan are a visible reminder of just how brutal this lake can be to a ship….

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…and a flyover will reveal many of the other wrecks in the passage.

We had an excellent example of the moodiness of Lake Michigan this past week.

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This is a photo of the 620 foot long Mississagi, heading south through the fog towards Muskegon on Thursday.

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On the ship’s return northward on Friday, it was met with 50 + MPH gusts coming from the northwest.  As a reference, this photo was taken on the east side of the Manitou Islands, so the ship was not experiencing the high waves that were occurring out in the open lake on the west side.

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But look what the captain did once he was past Leland and North Manitou Island.  With the full brunt of the gale hitting them broadside, he choose to turn the bow northwestward and head across the lake to calmer waters along the Upper Peninsula shore.  Once there, he turned northeastward and headed towards the Straits of Mackinac.  As he passed Mackinac Island, he witnessed the only shipping casualty of that day’s storm. The tug and barge Defiance/Ashtabula had run aground.  Once the gale subsided, that ship was able to be freed from the clay bottom with little damage.  The storm was strong enough to not only close the Mackinac Bridge to high profile vehicles but also the Soo Locks.  That rarely happens.

Nowadays, rescues are performed by the Coast Guard with helicopters and enclosed motor lifeboats.  Back when the Illinois sought shelter in South Manitou Harbor in 1913, the U.S. Life Saving Service (USLSS) had other equipment at their disposal.

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For the wrecks that were farther than 500 yards from shore, the USLSS would use an open surfboat to rescue stranded sailors.  The Sleeping Bear Point Life Saving Station performed 5% of their rescues in this manner.  But since most wrecks occurred along the shore, a beach apparatus was employed to bring the crew to safety.

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That consisted of several lines, a breeches buoy, and a cannon (called a Lyle Gun) to fire the initial line over the ship.  The breeches buoy was nothing more than a pair of pants (britches) attached to a life ring.  What this apparatus amounted to was similar to a modern day zip line.

Here at Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore, we perform a daily demonstration (summer months only) of the beach apparatus using young volunteers from the audience as surfmen.  This program is called Heroes of the Storm.

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Here is Captain Diana with her crew, Raggedy Ann and Andy, calling for help from her stranded ship.  A simulated Lyle Gun fires a projectile with a line out to the ship, which allows the captain to drag out the heavier rescue lines.

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Here is Captain Jim on another occasion sending Ann towards the shore in the breeches buoy.

A special treat occurs on Thursdays, right after the Heroes program.  That is the day an actual Lyle Gun is fired.  This cannon is the only gun invented by the U.S. Army to save lives instead of take them.

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An 18-pound projectile, similar to the one I am holding here, is loaded into the Lyle gun.  A 200-yard long shot line is tied to the end of it.  That is fired out into Sleeping Bear Bay each week.  Once the line is hauled back in, it is hung along the station’s picket fence to dry.  Once dried out, it is the park volunteer’s job to ‘fake’ the line into what is called the faking box.

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Here is Diana winding the rope around the faking box pegs.

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And here we are with 200 yards of faked rope.  There is a lid that is put over this afterwards. Once at the beach, the whole thing is turned over and the rope is slid off the pegs and into the lid.  Hopefully it doesn’t tangle when they fire the gun!  Let’s find out in this slo-mo video.  This took place the day we faked the rope:

Lyle Gun video: CLICK HERE

So there you have it.  That brought a smile to our faces!

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Until next time, safe and happy travels to all!

 

The Finest Hours

“You have to go out; you don’t have to come back” 

Unofficial Coast Guard motto

 

September 8, 2018

A few months back, you may recall that we stopped into the Old Harbor Lifesaving Station while we were visiting the Cape Cod National Seashore.  One of the reasons for that visit was to see how a tour of a maritime museum is conducted.  Our tour guide, a National Park Service volunteer named David, inspired us with his ability to portray what life in the U.S. Life Saving Service was like.  While we were there, he gave us a tip to go see a famous Coast Guard boat that was docked in Rock Harbor, some 30 miles to the south.  It was the subject of a movie called The Finest Hours.

This turned out to be a case where history stared us right in the face and we didn’t catch it.

The next day, we set off to explore Cape Cod’s elbow, first visiting Chatham, and then Rock Harbor.  At Chatham, we parked in front of the Coast Guard station and lighthouse. This complex overlooks the Chatham Bars, a series of sandbars that extend out into the ocean.

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We were a bit more focused on this shack constructed along the shore, but we did note how far out the waves were breaking on the ever-changing sand bars.  Shortly after taking this photo, a driving rain came in off of the ocean, so we failed to photograph the station and lighthouse.  Instead, we headed up to Rock Harbor to see the boat that David had mentioned.  Once at the dock, we were greeted by this sign:

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Still not familiar with the story or the film The Finest Hours, we descended to the lower dock to examine the boat.

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Obviously well restored and impressive to look at, the CG-36500 was tied up with little explanation to it’s storied past, short of the fact that it was a gold medal boat that had saved 32 men.  Not knowing much about Coast Guard history, we focused on how impeccable this boat was and not much else.

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The fittings on the craft were impressive.  Still, we were somewhat more interested in the U.S. Life Saving Service on this trip than the Coast Guard, so this small beauty’s story didn’t fully grab our attention.  We left the dock with the intention to see the movie and to research the boat’s story.  One thing led to another, and that didn’t happen.

Fast forward to our boat museum in the former Glen Haven Canning Company building at Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore.   When we started our stint as volunteers here at the beginning of August, it was hard not to notice the largest boat in the museum as being similar to the CG-36500 we saw in Massachusetts back in May.

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Turns out it was not only similar, but built from the same blueprint.  Our boat, the CG-36527, had been stationed at Duluth, Minnesota.

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Both crafts, along with the 128 sister TRS 36-foot motor lifeboats, were built by hand at the Curtis Bay Yard in Maryland.

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Not being in the water, it appeared much larger than it’s fleetmate out on Cape Cod.  The boat is self-bailing, self-righting, 10 tons and its motor will run upside down.  Solid as a stone and virtually unsinkable.  It is rated to carry a crew of four and up to twelve survivors.

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The ‘pudding’ bumper on the front is a work of art.  Visitors comment that it resembles a mustache.

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Standing on an easel by the front of the craft, this poster is displayed.

There’s that movie we failed to see…

So we watched the movie, then read the book of the same title.  The story goes like this:  A ferocious winter storm off the coast of Cape Cod in February of 1952 caught two World War II era tankers in its grip.  Both ships split in two between their bows and sterns.  The Fort Mercer was able to get a distress call off, and the Coast Guard sent most of their boats to assist in rescuing that ship’s crew.  The Pendleton wasn’t able to get an SOS off before it broke up, and it wasn’t until they were noticed on radar that the Chatham stationmaster Daniel Cluff went into action.  He ordered Boatswain’s Mate Bernie Webber to gather three other men and head out in the CG-36500 to see if there were any survivors.  Doing so meant they had to cross the dangerous Chatham Bars that we mentioned earlier.  Those sandbars have been known to rip boats to pieces in mild seas, and the waves that afternoon were upwards of 60 feet high!  Most of the locals considered it impossible.

“You have to go out; you don’t have to come back.”

Crossing the bar meant timing the waves, gunning the throttle on the upside and switching to full reverse throttle down the backside…so as to keep from driving the bow into the sand.  The ship’s compass was ripped loose and lost overboard almost immediately and the windshield was shattered.  Miraculously, they made it past the bars, but they were now running purely on Webber’s knowledge of the currents and the winds.  They somehow found the stern of the Pendleton, which was still afloat.  On deck were 33 men, anxious to get off.  (It was discovered later that the bow section had partially sank, killing the captain and crew that were in it.)

Remember, the CG-36500 is rated to carry a crew of four and up to twelve survivors.

Suddenly, a Jacob’s ladder was thrown over Pendleton’s stern and the men started down.  Webber brought the little lifeboat in close to get each man, backing away in between to keep from smashing into the tanker’s side.  Men were packed into the survivor’s cabin and onto every available space on deck.  The only man that didn’t make it was Tiny Myers, the ship’s 300 pound cook.  He fell into the sea and a wave threw the lifeboat into him, killing him.  Once everyone was on board, Webber pointed the CG-36500 back towards shore, hoping to beach it somewhere.  The tide had risen and they were able to cross the bars rather quickly.  As luck would have it, they ended up at the mouth of Chatham Harbor and were able to come directly into the dock with their soaked and freezing survivors.

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All four crew members were awarded the Gold Lifesaving Medal for their efforts.  They tested CG-36500’s limits, which in turn performed beyond its intended purpose for them.  The mission is considered to be the Coast Guard’s greatest small boat rescue ever.  The craft continued to serve until it was decommissioned in 1968.  It was donated to the Cape Cod National Seashore with the intention that it would be displayed in a museum.  Funds never materialized, and the boat was left to rot in a storage yard, totally exposed to the elements.  The Orleans Historical Society acquired it in 1981 and restored it to the operational beauty it is today.

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In 2002, the crew was reassembled for the 50th anniversary of the rescue, and they were able to take the CG-36500 out for a tour of the harbor with Webber at the helm..  That would have been a sight to see. Clockwise from the front:  Andy Fitzgerald, Richard Livesey, Charles Bridges (Pendleton crewmember who later joined the Coast Guard), Ervin Maske and Bernie Webber.

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If you find yourself on Cape Cod, be sure to stop in Rock Harbor and view this wonderful piece of history.  Maybe rent the movie or read the book. Or if you find one of the 15 or so remaining 36 footers that grace our nation’s maritime museums, take a moment to imagine that night in 1952 when the Coast Guard witnessed their finest hours.

Until next time, safe and happy travels to all!

Meet Me in St. Louie, Louie!

August 17-20, 2018

Some weekends are meant to be remembered.  Such was August 17 through the 20th for us, as we flew to St. Louis, Missouri for our Godson’s wedding.  We caught a very early flight out of Traverse City on Friday morning for Detroit, then a hop over to the Gateway to the West following that.  When we got to the counter at Alamo Rent-a-car, we informed the agent that we were going to picking up two more people, and I asked if a standard SUV was big enough.  When I informed him that one of the people was a hair stylist, Charles looked at me and said “You need a bigger car.”

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He set us up in this awesome Ford Expedition for a slight up-charge.

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Perfect for Carpool Karaoke!  Where’s James Cordon?  To be fair to Christine (2nd from left), her civil engineer sister Nina had more luggage.  🙂

That evening, while the families of the bride and groom were at rehearsal dinner, the rest of us hung out in Alton, Illinois at the Bluff City Grill.  Mike asked Christine to tell us about her travel day.

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Hands flying, she proceeded to go into detail from start to finish, leaving us all in stitches.

The next morning, we all prepared for the big event.

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Here is the father and mother of the groom, Jim and Sue, with their daughter Jess.  After a lovely ceremony in Edwardsville, Illinois, we all headed to the reception in Alton.

Friends

Here are our first and second generation Western Michigan University friends who attended the wedding.  From left:  Sarah, Brian, Mike, Cindy, Bill, Christine, Nina, Billy, Alissa, Karen, Sheryl, Paul, myself, and Diana.  After dinner, we all got up to dance for the first song and pretty much remained on the dance floor the rest of the night.  I can’t remember a reception we’ve been at that was as much fun as this one was!

The next morning rolled around quickly.  Over in St. Louis, Josh and Jaclyn were ready for another day of celebration with their families and friends before they headed off on their honeymoon.

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Here is the happy couple!  No doubt who the bride and groom were.  🙂

We all planned a get together later in the afternoon, so several of us headed to the Gateway Arch for a ride to the top.

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Heading in, Alissa’s look summed up her thoughts.  “We are going up THERE???”  

Once inside the base of the arch, we checked out the museum.

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I’ve always thought Mike had a resemblance to Teddy Roosevelt; here was my chance to make the comparison.  Do you see it?

Arch View

Once we were at the top, the little windows offered us a great view of the city.

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And since they are angled at the bottom of the triangular shape of the arch, it is possible to look straight underneath, over 600 feet down!  The curved, dark streak is the shadow of the arch.  The people below look like ants.  🙂

Friends in Arch

Before long, we lined up for the tram back down.  Once on terra firma, we went out for lunch and then took a trolley ride around the city.

Forest Park

Either this group is fascinated by the view of Forest Park, or they are mooning the photographer.  🙂  All too soon, our weekend came to a close.  It is, no doubt, one we will remember for a long time to come.

Next up, a fascinating bit of maritime history that just about floated by us.  Be sure to stay tuned for that.  Until then, safe and happy travels to all!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sleeping Bear 2018

July 29 – August 14, 2018

We are happy to be back in Leelanau County, Michigan for the months of August and September.  We will be volunteering for Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore.   As we did for Oregon State Parks, we will be working as Interpretive Volunteers throughout the park.  Our duties include working in the two maritime locations, the visitor center, and as narrators on bus tours of Pierce Stocking Scenic Drive.

Campsite

As compensation, we are given a campsite at D.H. Day Campground.

We came in a few days early and camped at Leelanau Sands Casino, just north of Suttons Bay.  In order to stay there, we had to sign up for a Players Club card.  First time cardholders are given $10 in free slot play.

Leelanau Sands

I had a pretty lucky night.  The machine I was playing started going wild!  The guy next to me was laughing, as he thought I was doing pretty good for a 30 cent bet.  When I informed him I was playing on the casino’s money, his jaw hit the floor.  By the time we walked out, I was over $180 in winnings.  Not bad for someone who doesn’t frequent casinos!

Before we headed to Sleeping Bear, our friends Linda and Steven came and stayed next to us at Leelanau Sands.

Linda and Steven

We all went to Patti and Lane’s house for dinner, along with Rod and Mary.  We also went out to eat a few times and checked out Peterson Park.

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We love the view from up there, as it’s possible to see four islands on a clear day.

We also went kayaking on Little Traverse Lake with Lane and Patti.  Here they are heading back out after we had to get ready to go back to our camp.

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Pretty soon, it was our first day on the job….which also happened to be out 36th anniversary!

First day Sleeping Bear

Here we are in the Cannery, which is a fruit processing plant turned boat museum.

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The boat I am sitting in front of is identical to the one from the movie, The Finest Hours.  It is self-righting, self-bailing, practically unsinkable and the diesel engine will run upside down.

The other maritime location is the 1902 lifesaving station.  The boathouse is said to be the most completely equipped station in the United States.

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Here I am letting one our visitors feel how heavy the Lyle gun projectile is.  That particular gun would shoot a line over a disabled ship in order to establish a lifesaving zipline, then called a breeches buoy.  The Lyle gun was the only cannon ever developed to save lives, instead of taking them.

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We also have two open surfboats on display.

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And every afternoon, the park puts on a program called Heroes of the Storm, a reenactment of how a Lyle gun rescue works.  Seven children are pulled out of the crowd to serve as surfmen.  The sailors they save from the ‘ship’ are Raggedy Ann and Andy.  It’s really fun.  🙂

And on Thursdays, the park fires off a real Lyle gun.  It is a sight to see!

Lyle Gun 1

The initial blast…

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…pushing out the flame and the projectile.

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As the projectile gets dragged by the shot line coming out of the blue box, it turns around and heads out over the water….

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…eventually landing 200 yards out, dragging the shot line behind it.  The surfmen back in the day could launch the projectile up to 600 yards.

We also worked at the Port Oneida Fair, which is a celebration of the early 20th Century rural culture. Living history activities were held at several of the historic farms, as well as the school house, that are a part of Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore.

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Diana worked at the washtub station, teaching children how to do laundry.

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When the local TV station started filming, we  decided to watch the news that night.  Not only was she on there…

Corn Sheller

…so was I, teaching kids how to run a corn sheller.  🙂

Dulcimer

One gentleman was even teaching youngsters how to play a hammer dulcimer.

Blacksmith Shop

And who is that in the Blacksmith shop?  Well that is Diana, providing lunch relief for the blacksmith and keeping the fire going, while explaining the role of the blacksmith in the town of Glen Haven.  🙂

Northport

We also were visited by our friends Jodee and Bill!  Here we are at Music in the Park in Northport.

Gravels and Belisles

We also checked out Sleeping Bear and the Old Mission Peninsula with them….

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…and their sweet fluffy dog Tessa.  🙂

Our last night with them, we managed to get tickets for The Accidentals.  We have been following this trio for several years now.  Their latest album Odyssey has been played in our CD players from Oregon to Florida to Maine and back to Michigan.

The Accidentals

Diana and I have seen them perform twice in the past at outside venues, but it was great to see and hear them inside an auditorium.   The four of us were blown away, hooting and hollering throughout the show.  If you ever have the opportunity to see them, don’t miss it.

Well, that gives you an idea of what we’ve been up to the past few weeks.  Stay tuned for our next post as we continue to find new adventures to share with you.  Until then, safe and happy travels to all!

 

 

Photographs and Memories

July 6 – 28, 2018

“Photographs and memories
Christmas cards you sent to me
All that I have are these
To remember you”

Jim Croce

Sometimes our lives move so fast, we forget to look back and see where we’ve been.  And while our 4 month rambling trip from Florida to Michigan was anything but quick, we had a tendency to focus on the road ahead to our next destination.  That all changed when we left Cooperstown, NY.  It was about then that our plans completely turned to Jello.  We knew we had several people we wanted to visit in Michigan and Indiana, but nothing spoke to us as what route to take or what order to do it in.  We had several options to choose from.  Day by day, the next stopping point was chosen, but the overall route continued to elude us.  What we didn’t realize was that a single event was going to end up choosing our path for us.  And once we were here, it turned out that each location held a period of reflection for us, filled with boxes of photographs and memories.

Our first stop beyond Cooperstown was Seneca Lake, NY.

Rig at White Springs Winery

We had wanted to spend some time at one of the several Harvest Hosts locations that our friends Linda and Steven (The Chouters) had stayed at last year.  We chose this dandy spot at White Springs Winery, just south of Geneva.

Jim at White Springs Winery

It was a great place to not only share a bottle of Pinot Grigio, but to enjoy a fabulous view!  Our original plans had us staying at two separate wineries, but we opted to move further down the road after a two night stay.

From that point, we had to decide whether to route through Canada or the United States.  We chose the latter, as we were thinking we would want to visit my aunt and uncle in Indiana first.  We spent a few nights at Westfield, NY on the southern shore of Lake Erie.

Barcelona Lighthouse

This charming little community is home to the Barcelona Lighthouse, which was built in 1829.  It has the distinction as being the first lighthouse to be lit using natural gas.  A concrete dome was built over a spring a half mile away to trap escaping gases, and a pipe was laid between the two structures.  Pretty fancy technology for the early 1800’s.  We also discovered that the area is a major grape-growing region, and was home to Welch’s near the end of the 19th century.

It was at this location that our route became clearer.  Diana received a call that her aunt wasn’t doing well.  We’ve always been close to Aunt Marion and Uncle Bob, so we made tracks for Flint, Michigan without haste.  We stopped at Cabela’s in Dundee, Michigan for the night, close to 300 miles from our starting point that morning.

Cabelas Dundee display

If there is one thing that Cabela’s does well, it’s how they showcase the mounts in each store.  The displays in this 225,000 square foot location are spectacular.  Instead of one musk ox, they show an entire herd of them facing off against a pack of wolves.

By the time we reached Flint the next day, Aunt Marion had passed.  We were fortunate to get a camping spot at the Flushing Moose Lodge just a few miles from Bob and Marion’s home, which ended up working very well for us.  We spent the next days with family, sorting through photographs and remembering happier times.

Bob and Marion

Here is a photo of Bob and Marion, looking their usual dapper selves.  🙂  They were quite a duo.  Marion was Diana’s mother’s sister.

During our stay, we took the opportunity to drive by Diana’s childhood home and to visit the cemetery where her parents are buried.  On the way back to Flushing, we drove by the house where Diana’s mother grew up in Goodrich.  This also was the spot where Uncle Bob met Aunt Marion over 70 years ago.  The current owners were outside, so Diana mentioned to them that her grandparents used to live there.  They graciously invited us in!

Diana at Grandma's house

Needless to say, Diana was overjoyed to be able to show me the home.  Many memories were shared, and several of the owners questions were answered as to how the house used to be. The woodwork on the stairs to the basement survived several remodels.

After the funeral, we headed north to visit my sister Judy and brother-in-law Dale in Harrison, Michigan.  We attended a benefit concert for the local library and visited the local veteran’s museum that Dale helps out with.

Grandpa Belisle

One of the displays was of Judy’s and my paternal grandfather, a veteran of World War I.  He was a Canadian citizen at the time, fighting as a U.S. Army soldier.

Jim paddleboarding

While we were there, I even had the opportunity to try out Judy and Dale’s paddle board.  I never fell off, but I sure felt it the next day!  🙂  Judy and I also pulled out a box of family photos, as I was looking for a particular photograph.  I never found it, but I did come upon this gem:

GG Schmitt

This is my Great Grandpa and Great Grandma Schmitt.  He’s the one who built Old Mackinac Point Lighthouse, among other things.  This photograph is probably from the 1870’s.  We are only three generations apart, despite the many years.  Do you think we look a bit like each other?

From Harrison, we headed south towards Indiana.  We stopped along the way at the Moose Lodge in Otsego, just north of Kalamazoo.  We used that as a base to travel down to see my aunt and uncle.  We also went to dinner with our friends Mike and Cindy, and then the next night with Paul and Sheryl.

Vennix's and us

We completely forgot to get a photo with Paul and Sheryl, but here we are with Mike and Cindy.  There was lots of catching up on what we’ve all been doing.  Two great evenings with two sets of wonderful friends.  🙂

And in Indiana, we were able to catch up with Uncle Ed and Aunt Marge, two of my mom’s siblings.  Uncle Ed wasn’t feeling the best, so we didn’t pester him with a photo.  While we were at Aunt Marge’s, we took a look through her photos to see if I could find the family photo I was looking for.  No luck again, but I did find these beauties:

Grandpa and me

Here I am with my maternal grandfather in 1976.  He was 92 and I was 18 at the time.  For the record, I loved Detroit back then and I still do today.

Grandma and Grandpa K

And here are my maternal grandparents, just before World War II.  Grandma is the daughter of the Schmitts in the earlier photo.

Mom and siblings

And here is my mom with my aunt and uncles.  Uncle Ed is in front, with (left to right) John, Mom, Marge and Fritz behind him.  All three boys would soon be in the war and Aunt Marge in the convent.

Aunt Marge and me

And that is where she is today, as sharp as ever at 94 years young.  It was great to be able to spend time with her and Uncle Ed.  🙂

We’ve spent the past few days taking care of doctor and dentist visits, and the general things we like to take care of around Grand Rapids.  We visited my parents’ graves and even found my buddy Richie’s crypt in a mausoleum in the same cemetery.  That kind of knocked the stuffing out of us for a bit.  You might recall him from our post, Reflections in the Rear View Mirror.

So after a bit of a pause while sorting through old photographs and memories, we are ready to move forward and make some new ones.  This week we head north to Leelanau to start a new adventure for us.  Be sure to stay tuned for our next post, as we describe what that entails.  Until then, safe and happy travels to all!

 

 

 

Cooperstown and the Baseball Hall of Fame

“The one constant through all the years has been baseball. America has rolled by like an army of steamrollers. It has been erased like a blackboard, rebuilt and erased again. But baseball has marked the time. This field, this game: it’s a part of our past. It reminds us of all that once was good and it could be again.”

James Earl Jones as Terence Mann, Field of Dreams  – 1989

July 2-6, 2018 – Cooperstown, New York

After leaving Lake George, we decided to head to Cooperstown, NY.  This is a place that celebrates so much of what my early years were about: the game of baseball.

Growing up in suburban Detroit, my world centered around the Detroit Tigers.  That was passed down from my dad. As a teenager, he would jump on a streetcar in River Rouge and head to what was then known as Briggs Stadium to see the legends of the 1930’s play.  Stories of the Tigers greats were a given, but they were also peppered with other heroes like Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig.  Detroit was the only team in the majors to top 1 million a year in attendance during the Great Depression (in 1935 and 1937), which shows the depth of the love of the game in the Motor City.  On many occasions in the late 1960’s and early 70’s, Dad would come home from work and say “Jimmer, want to go to a game?”  Within half an hour, we were in the bleachers cheering on our Tigs.  Quite often, those excursions would include my sister and my mom.  Judy could have become a baseball statistician, as she was awesome at filling out a scorecard. Mom loved the game also, and was one of those gals who would come ten feet out of her seat when the Tigers scored a run.  It didn’t matter that Detroit itself was falling apart at the seams, as baseball seemed to transcend the tensions of that era.

So coming to Cooperstown is like returning to Tiger Stadium for me.  Diana and I were here one other time in the 1980’s, and we were awestruck by the quaint charm of the town and beauty of the area.  At that time, we had dropped down along Lake Otsego from the New York Thruway.

I88 in NY

This time, we came in from the south.  We were amazed how beautiful the scenery was on the southern route along Interstate 88.  If there is one thing that has become apparent to us on this trip, it’s that the State of New York is an absolutely gorgeous place. 🙂

Lake Otsego

Cooperstown itself is a cozy little hamlet, nestled along the southern shore of Lake Otsego.

Mouth of Susquehana

It is here that the Susquehanna River begins it’s long journey to Chesapeake Bay.

While most of the stores on Main Street are baseball themed, there are a few that are normal, small-town America establishments.

Cooperstown DIner

One of those is the Cooperstown Diner.  Strictly a short-order type of place, you practically have to back out after eating, as there is no room to turn around.  We ate there on our first visit and enjoyed it.

Doubleday Field

Tucked behind Main Street is Doubleday Field.  This is the ‘home’ of baseball, as lore has that Abner Doubleday and friends first played the game on this spot in 1839.  Back then, it was a cow pasture.  During baseball’s centennial year of 1939, the first All Star game was played here.  That was also the year the Hall of Fame opened its doors.  Since then, there has been an annual Hall of Fame game played here between two major league teams, along with 350 other baseball contests of some sort.

Jim at Doublday Field

Watching a game here is a treat, as is evident by the smile on my face.   Sitting on the wooden benches brought new meaning to the term ‘box seats’.  🙂

The Hall of Fame itself is tucked into a series of storefronts at the east end of Main Street.  One of the first things seen upon entering the building are a series of 30 lockers, each one representing a major league team.

Tigers locker

Here is the Detroit Tigers locker, which contains a few items that relate to the team.  In case you are wondering, Jackie Robinson didn’t play for the Tigers; the commissioner retired his number league-wide on April 15, 1997.  That was the 50th anniversary of Robinson breaking the color barrier in the majors.  Also, since no one wore a number in the early days of the game, Tiger great Ty Cobb didn’t have a number to retire.

Many other Tiger items were scattered throughout the building.

Ty Cobb sweater

This is Ty Cobb’s warm-up sweater.  Teams now wear jackets during chilly games.

Ty Cobb bat and spikes

They also had one of his bats and his spikes.  Legend has him portrayed as a dirty player, born from his take-no-prisoners style on the base paths and his aggressive style of play.  By the time his career ended in 1928, he has amassed 90 major league records.  Many of those still stand today.  After his baseball career, he became a successful businessman and was a generous philanthropist.

Another larger than life player from that era was Babe Ruth.  The Hall of Fame has an entire section devoted to him.  George Herman ‘Babe’ Ruth was born and raised in Baltimore, where he had a reputation as a hell-raiser.  He was sent to a Catholic reformatory at age 7, and was eventually taken under the wing of Brother Matthias.  During his twelve years at the school he became proficient at stickball and baseball, eventually being noticed by the then-minor league Baltimore Orioles.  From there, his contract was purchased by the major league Boston Red Sox.

Babe and Helen Ruth

The day he arrived in Boston, he met a waitress at a coffee shop named Helen Woodford.  Before long he proposed to her with the line, “How about you and me getting married, hon?” I chuckled at this, as everyone is “hon’ in Baltimore.  🙂  She said yes, and the teenagers were married three months after that first meeting.  Babe went on to become one of the greatest players the game has ever seen.  His 575 foot home run at Navin Field (later Briggs Stadium and then Tiger Stadium) in Detroit still stands as the longest home run in major league history.  His career 714 home runs stood from 1935 until 1974.  Sadly, Ruth died from esophageal cancer at age 53.

The person who broke Babe’s home run record in 1974 was Henry Aaron.  Hammerin’ Hank, an African-American, received hate mail and death threats at the prospect of him breaking Ruth’s record.  After finishing the 1973 season with 713 homers, his biggest fear was that he wouldn’t live to break the record the following year.  He did, and he ended up finishing his career with 755 home runs.  A home run that didn’t count towards that total was one he hit in the 1971 All-Star Game in Detroit.  I was one seat behind the guy who caught it in the upper deck of right-center field.  The ball had a dent in it, resulting in it not flying straight (and me ducking).  My dad so wanted to catch it for me, but the guy in front gave it to his boy, and the kid was overjoyed.  I told Dad, ” That’s ok, Dad…look how happy he is!”

Hank Aaron medals

Aaron was awarded the Presidential Citizens Medal and the Presidential Medal of Freedom by Presidents Bill Clinton and George W. Bush for his contributions to the United States.

Another story from the 1971 All Star Game was the home run that Reggie Jackson hit.  We were sitting in the upper deck below the light tower in right-center, which was hidden from our view by the roof above us.  The ball jumped off of Jackson’s bat and he stood in awe (as did the rest of us) as the ball rose high in the Detroit sky and over our heads.  When the ball fell back to the field, we assumed it had hit the roof.  We found out after the game that it actually hit a transformer on the light tower, a whopping 400 feet from home plate.  Had that tower not been there it could have easily surpassed Ruth’s record homer on the same piece of real estate, as the ball was still rising when it hit.

Tiger Stadium at All Star Time Detroit

Because it struck the transformer (see the blue arrow in the photo above), it technically was not hit out of the park.  Diana and I were fortunate enough to witness him finally clear that roof to the right of that arrow in 1984 when he played for the Angels.

There are so many memories for me in that stadium.  With two complete decks circling the field there was a constant level of sound from the crowd, even when nothing exciting was happening.  At the point when something did happen, the place erupted.  When Mom, Dad, Diana and I saw our last game there in 1999, I stopped Dad as he started to walk down the tunnel to leave the stands.  I wanted to get one last glimpse of the field with him, knowing the Tigers were moving across town the next season.  He reluctantly turned, revealing tears in his eyes.  Neither one of us said a word.  We didn’t need to.

Back to Cooperstown.  The Hall of Fame covers all aspects of the game, including the Negro Leagues, the Latin connection. and the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League.  The latter was founded during World War II to keep baseball in the public eye, as there was a fear that the majors would cease play due to a lack of players.

Grand Rapids Chicks

Teams such as the Grand Rapids Chicks, the Rockford Peaches, and the Kalamazoo Lassies were highlighted in this exhibit and in the movie A League of Their Own.

San DIego Chicken

And who can forget the San Diego Chicken?  🙂

The actual Hall of Fame is the place where the plaques of baseball’s greats are showcased.

Baseball Hall of Fame

It extends to a central point where the original 5 inductees are displayed.

Ty Cobb

Right in the middle of those 5 is Ty Cobb, sporting the Tiger’s Olde English D on his cap. 🙂

Babe Ruth

Next to him is Yankee great Babe Ruth, one of the most beloved players ever.

Hank Aaron

And here is Hammerin’ Hank Aaron, who holds that spot in my heart from 1971.

A couple of the many Tigers in the Hall that are special to me are…

Al Kaline

…another Baltimore native, Al Kaline.  One of the greatest Tigers ever, he started with the team at 18 years old and is still employed by the team at the age of 83.  You may recall our post Al Kaline and a Day with Family that included a giant photo of him that we delivered to Diana’s brother in Florida.  Dan had won a Detroit Free Press contest as a child after he wrote to explain why his school should get the photo, and was dubbed the World’s Greatest Al Kaline Fan.  His school displayed the photo for awhile, then offered it back to Dan.

Sparky Anderson

And a fan favorite, long-time Tiger Manager Sparky Anderson.  Even though he managed many more years with the Tigers than he did with the Reds, he wanted his plaque to have him in a Cincinnati cap, as they were the ones who first took a chance with him.  A classic exchange between him and Kirk Gibson during the 1984 World Series can be seen at the end of this post.

The 1984 Tiger team has two members being inducted into the Hall this year: Jack Morris and Alan Trammell.

Trammel and Morris

The backing plates with their signatures stand ready for their plaques.

Jack Morris

Just outside the Hall is a display with some of Morris’ memorabilia…

Alan Trammel

…along with some of Trammell’s treasures.

Ernie quote

And my all-time favorite Tiger was the guy who penned this quote:  Ernie Harwell.  He was the radio announcer for most of my life.  To most Detroiters, his voice was the music of the game the city loved so much.  Many summer nights were spent listening to him on my transistor radio next to my bed.  His easy Georgia accent was very soothing to listen to.  When a batter took a called third strike, Ernie would say, “He stood there like a house by the side of the road,” and a Tiger home run would result in, “That ball is LOOOOOOONG gone!”  On a foul ball into the stands he would say, “A man from (insert a name of a Michigan town) got that one,” as a way to acknowledge listeners from the region.  As a kid, it took me many years before I realized he really didn’t know where the person who caught the ball was from.  🙂

Ernies mic

Ernie’s microphone is displayed in the Hall of Fame, along with an audio recording of him calling the first inning of the last game ever played at Memorial Stadium in Baltimore.  I actually remember listening to that game.

Ernie Harwell

He is enshrined at Cooperstown as a Ford C. Frick Award winner, given to broadcasters for their major contributions to the sport.  A recording of some of his calls can be heard by clicking HERE.

And the Sparky Anderson video can be seen HERE.

Be sure to listen carefully to Sparky’s voice after Gibby’s home run.  It’s classic. 🙂

That wraps up our time in Cooperstown.  Be sure to stay tuned as we head back to Michigan to spend time with family and friends.  Until then, safe and happy travels to all!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lake Placid and the Adirondacks

June 25 – July 1, 2018 – Adirondack Park, New York

One of our first vacations as a married couple was a 1985 trip to Lake Placid and the Adirondacks in upstate New York.  This was before we started our series of trips to Maine, which began a year later.  Since it had been so long, one of our goals this year was to return to the Adirondack region to reacquaint ourselves with the area.

Adirondack Park covers 9,375 square miles, about 1/5 of the entire state of New York.  It was created in the late 1800’s to keep the wilderness from being over developed.  The preserve includes over 100 towns, making it different than a traditional state park.  It is overseen by the Adirondack Park Agency, which puts limits on what can and can’t be built within the park boundaries.  The state’s highest peak, Mt. Marcy, is found here along with a number of other tall mountains.

One of the most popular communities is Lake Placid.  Home to both the 1932 and 1980 Winter Olympic Games, this village has established itself as a training mecca for Olympic athletes. It is also a tourist destination, as the outdoor recreational possibilities seem endless.

1932 Rink

This is the 1932 Olympic rink.  Not a lot of room for spectators!  We were enjoying watching the workers prepare for an upcoming figure skating event.  That brought back a lot of memories for me, as I worked as a Zamboni driver while I was in college.

1980 Rink 1

Next door is the 1980 rink, now known as Herb Brooks Arena.  This is where the US hockey team beat the Russians, then went on to win the gold medal by defeating Finland.  As you enter the rink, the sign above the door states “Home of the Miracle on Ice – Site of the Greatest Sporting Event of the 20th Century”.  Some may debate that last part, but it certainly was right up there.  A personal side story to that: The night the US team beat the Russians, our Western Michigan University hockey team was also hosting a game.  My friend and fellow Zamboni driver, Mike, and myself were watching the college game from the stands. You have to remember, this was during the Cold War and although hopes were high, no one thought the US stood much of a chance against the Russian team.  Our pro shop manager came up in the stands to tell the public address announcer that the US team had won, but stopped to tell us first. After a little quick thinking, we instead returned to the pro shop and grabbed a piece of poster board and wrote “FINAL – USA 4, USSR 3” on it.  We rolled it up, grabbed some hockey tape and headed to the Zamboni.  Our lead driver, John, didn’t see us sneak into the Zamboni room and tape it on the front of the machine.  After the period ended he backed onto the ice and started circling the rink, and the place went absolutely wild!  It was like a wave as the crowd saw the sign as he went around and rose to their feet, roaring far louder than they had for Western scoring a goal. The look on his face was priceless, as he never had been cheered for doing his job.  As he stopped by the guy pulling the net pins from the ice, he was told to look at the front of the machine.  He climbed down, looked at the front and thrust both arms in the air.  The crowd lost it.  🙂

Zamboni at Lake Placid Olympic Ice Center

Attached to the back of the 1980 Olympic arena is a third rink.  This is where the curling events took place.  It was interesting to see that it wasn’t a dedicated facility, in that it also could be used for hockey and figure skating.  It sure would be fun to be up in that Zamboni driver’s seat again!

Inside the arena complex, we toured the Lake Placid Olympic Museum.

Torches from several Olympic games over the years.

We found this collection of Olympic torches to be interesting…

Uniforms from the US Olympic teams from the Winter Olympics over the years.

…as were the uniforms worn through the years by the US athletes at the opening and closing ceremonies.  There were other items that had to do mostly with the two Olympics that took place in Lake Placid.

Lake Placid Olympic Speed Skating Oval

Across the street from the arena complex is the outdoor speed skating oval.  This is where Eric Heiden won his five gold medals in 1980.  We were surprised that it was outdoors, as the newer Olympic venues are all inside.  What a view!

Just down the road in the town of North Elba is the Ski Jumping Complex.

Lake Placid Olympic ski jumps

The 90 and 120 meter hills are easily seen from most places in the Lake Placid area.

Lake Placid ski jumps from the new event center at the bottom

This is the view from the deck of the new Intervale Lodge at the base of the jumps.  This entire complex is being constantly updated and is used year round.

Installing the summer jumping surface on the ski jumps

In the summer months, jumpers use an artificial surface to ski on.  In the photo above, workers can be seen attaching the plastic material to the hill, similar to the method shingles are attached to a roof.

Immediately to the left of the ski jumps is the summer freestyle training facility.

Freestyle skier coming down the ramp

Here is a young man headed down the hill now!

Freestyle skier doing a backflip

Look at that….a back flip!  But where is he going to land in the summer, you ask???

Freestyle skier entering the pool

Why that would be into a 750,000 gallon pool!  Bet that feels good on a hot day.  🙂

Freestyle skier twisting off the jump

We watched from the stands for quite awhile as these daredevils twisted and flipped off the takeoff ramps into the water.  For all we know, we could have been looking at future Olympians.  It was very entertaining, to say the least.

Just across the road from the jumping complex is the place where the opening ceremonies for the 1980 Games was held.  It is now the home of the Lake Placid Horse Show.  Seeing that there appeared to be a big event going on, we decided to check it out!

Horse entering a jump at the Lake Placid Horse Show

What a treat to be able to see the horses and rider as they navigated the series of jumps.

Horse airborne at the Lake Placid Horse Show

It was a thrill to see them airborne!  Pretty remarkable to see an animal as big as this leap that far.

While we walked the grounds, we noticed this:

Cauldron from the 1980 Winter Olympics, Lake Placid

There’s the cauldron from the 1980 Winter Olympics!  It looked so much bigger on TV.  🙂

Another place we visited in the area was High Falls Gorge.  This 22 acre privately-owned attraction deserves a mention not only for its beauty, but also for what can happen when a natural feature ends up in private hands.

High Falls Gorge

Here is upper part of the cataract on the Au Sable River that appears in it’s pristine state.

High Falls Gorge with ramps

To reach the lower portion, the company has built ramps, platforms and bridges within the gorge.  To us, this tarnished the beauty of the falls.

Ramps at High Falls Gorge

And with it being private, the admission fee is right up there.  It seemed a bit odd that this was in the middle of the Adirondack State Preserve, but it’s been a private attraction since the 1890’s.  Nature’s creations deserve better stewardship, in our opinion.  While the falls themselves were beautiful, we felt that a state or national agency would have provided a more natural visitor experience.  In a much broader sense, this is why we feel that our public lands should not be allowed to fall into private hands. It cost us $11.95 each, plus 8% New York state sales tax for a total of $25.81. In comparison, our annual National Park Pass, which covers over 400 sites, is a bargain at $80.00.

Another thing we found in the area was the John Brown Farm.  You may recall us talking about him in our post from Harpers Ferry, where he led a raid that resulted in his being executed. At the time we noticed his farm was in North Elba, NY, but we had no idea where that actually was.

Ski jump from John Brown's grave

Well, standing next to his grave, the back of the 120 meter ski jump is easily seen.  Now we know where North Elba is.  🙂

John Brown statue

John Brown, who used violence to further the efforts to abolish slavery, is a controversial figure in US history.  Some travel here each year to show their respects on his birthday, others feel he was a bit of a zealot. The building behind the statue is his farmhouse.  The inscription under the figures’ feet says, “His soul goes marching on”.  That is a reference to the Civil War era song, John Brown’s Body, which was rewritten at a later date to become The Battle Hymn of the Republic.  In the former version, the lyrics start out “John Brown’s body lies a moulderin’ in the grave.”

John Brown's grave

Well, here is that grave he is a moulderin’ in, along with several of his followers who fought with him at Harpers Ferry.  That event is seen as one of the sparks that led to the Civil War.

John Brown Barn

Behind the house and grave is the barn.

John Brown Barn Basement

The lower level houses a nice display dedicated to the story of John Brown as an abolitionist.

John Brown Barn Main Level

The upper level speaks to the area’s role in the Underground Railroad.  Gerrit Smith, a wealthy landowner and politician who was a leader in the abolitionist movement, gave away 120,000 acres of North Elba land in 50 acre parcels to black families from the south. Being a property owner gave them a right to vote, as well as a means to becoming self-sufficient.  John Brown had purchased some of that acreage to help teach the former slaves how to work the land.  Unfortunately the area conditions weren’t conducive to farming, and the experiment failed. We found the entire farm to be fascinating, and it really tied in well with our visit to Harpers Ferry.

The other place we visited in the area was the top of Whiteface Mountain.

Diana and Jim on Whiteface Mountain, with Lake Placid in the background

Our last trip here was in a 1981 Chevette.  I remember that well, as we had to turn the air conditioning off to make it up the hill.  🙂  This is a great place to view Lake Placid from.

Leaving Lake Placid, we spent a few days in the Lake George area, at the southern end of Adirondack Park.  The weather turned hot, so we limited our activities to taking care of errands and celebrating my 60th birthday!  Our friends and fellow RV-Dreamers, Bonnie and Fred, have their home base in the area so the four of us met for a wonderful steak dinner at the Log Jam Restaurant.  We hadn’t seen them since March of 2017, so we had a lot of catching up to do.  As a result, we completely forgot to take photos.  They are going to spend the winter just down the road from us in Melbourne Beach, so I’m sure we will get some photos then.  🙂

That wraps up our time in the Adirondacks!  Next up, we move west through New York State to visit some of my childhood idols.  Be sure to check back here to see what that is all about.  Until then, safe and happy travels to all!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

New Hampshire & Vermont Adventures

June 16-23, 2016 – New Hampshire and Vermont

At the end of our last post, we alluded to the fact that our upcoming time in New Hampshire was “more of an adventure than we bargained for”.  As we were headed to our campground in Shelburne, NH, we stopped to fuel up along the way.  Not too long after that, our truck started sputtering and losing power.  I knew I had put diesel fuel in it, as I always check that first.  To boot, I was in a semi lane and my receipt says I bought diesel.  Anyway, we pulled over into another station and weighed our options.  While I checked the air filter for obstructions, Diana called a garage.  It was Saturday afternoon, and she just happened to get a diesel mechanic on the line.  He suspected water in the line and suggested I put some Heet water-dispersing additive in the tank, which I did.  I also drained the water separator and found water in the fuel. Long story short, it helped for a bit.  A few miles from the campground, it acted up again, so we decided a visit to a Ford garage was in order.  We originally had planned to leave Shelburne on Monday to meet Diana’s cousin and family in Rutland, Vermont on Friday, so we knew our plans would have to be adjusted.  Many thanks to the wonderful couple who own Timberland Campground for being so accommodating!  More on the truck in a bit…

Now that we had some time, we set out to visit a few of the local sites!  Our original plans were to visit Mt Washington, so that was the first thing in our queue.  We had visited this peak 30-some years ago on a cold, cloudy and windy day, so we really wanted to see it on a nice day.  June 17 was picture perfect, so we hopped into Edsel 2 and headed to the Mount Washington Auto Road.  When we arrived, the attendant said to me “Move your leg”. Is this the Hokey-Pokey?  No, he wanted to look at the shift lever to see if our vehicle had a low gear, a requirement for this climb and descent.  Turns out that they have a long list of vehicles not allowed on this road, including dually pickups, so all of our fellow fifth wheelers take note.  Our long box crew cab pickup…while not a dually…would have been too long.  There are even weight limits on how much a vehicle can carry.  From their website:

“The weight limits below are referring to passenger and luggage weight, not the weight of your vehicle. These are approximate numbers used as guidelines.

  • Full size car or wagon: 900lbs
  • Dodge Caravan, Plymouth Voyager prior to 1996: 600lbs (272 kg)
  • Dodge Caravan, Plymouth Voyager 1996 and newer: 900lbs (408 kg)
  • All other mini-vans: 900lbs (408 kg)
  • 3/4 or 1/2 ton van, pickup or SUV: 900lbs (408 kg)
  • One-ton van or pickup: 1050lbs (476 kg)”

Makes you wonder why they singled those pre-1996 Chrysler minivans out… 🙂

So up we went.  The route is a narrow, twisty road with an average 12% grade that was first opened to traffic in August of 1861.  You read that date right…1861.  Since not much has been done to the road since then, we weren’t able to dislodge our fingernails from the steering wheel and armrests long enough to take photos of it.  😉  Once at the top, we put the Nikon to work!

Panoramic view from the summit of Mt. Washington, NH

Look at that view!  The black line snaking below the summit is the Cog Railway, which is an alternate way to get to the top.

Mt. Washington Cog Railway

While we were at the summit, this locomotive and car came up to the top.  And what about those two hikers in the lower right corner?

Two hikers on the Appalachian Trail on Mt Washington, NH

They are on the Appalachian Trail, which crosses Mt. Washington.

Jim and Diana at the summit of Mt. Washington.

Look at us…we made it to the summit!  It was a tough climb from the parking lot.  🙂

Well worn benchmark at the top of Mt Washington, NH.

The benchmark is well-worn, as many folks have made their way to this point.

For those who don’t know, Mt. Washington has a weather station at the top.  The peak is known to have some nasty weather extremes, and it is a testing ground for many outdoor products.

Sign explaining the highest wind speed observed by man.

It was at this building that the highest wind ever observed by man was recorded: a whopping 231 miles per hour!  A higher wind was recorded by automated equipment since then in the southern hemisphere, but there weren’t any people present when it occurred.

Building on Mt Washington where the highest wind speed witnesses by man was recorded.

As you can see, they have chains over the building to keep it from blowing away.

Unlike our first visit, June 17, 2018 had very little wind and missed the record for the warmest day for that date by two degrees.

Besides Mt. Washington, we checked out a few other places in the area that were recommended to us by Laurie at Timberland.  One that really stood out was Glen Ellis Falls.

Upper falls on the Ellis River

The trail starts a few miles south of the Mt. Washington Auto Road and heads under NH-16 via a tunnel.  It isn’t long before cascades start to appear in the river, similar to the one shown above.  As the trail winds lower and lower into the canyon, we soon came upon Glen Ellis Falls.

Glen Ellis Falls on the Ellis River, just north of Jackson, NH.

They were absolutely beautiful!  We then continued down the road a ways to Jackson to see a recommended covered bridge.

Jackson, NH covered bridge, built in 1876.

As well maintained as it was, we were certain it was fairly new.  We were surprised to see that it was built in 1876!  There wasn’t a weight limit posted on it either.

On Tuesday, we got the truck back from the Ford garage in New Berlin.  Verdict was that they drained a quarter tank of fuel to get rid of the water.  They also replaced the fuel filters.  It ran well on the way back to the campground.  The next day, we hooked up and headed out.  About 45 minutes into our drive, it started missing again.  We ended up limping into a campground just east of St. Johnsbury, Vermont…short of our intended destination.  They had an open site, so we set up and headed to Twin State Ford.  At this point, we were at a total loss as to what was wrong.  Jordan in the service department told us they would get on it the next day.  Once again, we had time on our hands!  What to do when you are given a basket of lemons????

Lemonade

Make lemonade!  We drove around town to see what there was to do.

St. Johnsbury Welcome Center in the old train depot.

Diana found the St. Johnsbury Welcome Center, which is located in this beautiful train depot.  The depot still has the cool old benches, along with the antique communication equipment used to deal with the trains in the past.  The man working the counter, Richard, loaded us up on all sorts of unique things to see and do.  First thing we did was to head across the street to Anthony’s Diner to get one of their delicious burgers.

The next day, we headed to Dog Mountain.  This is a very special place, founded by artist Stephen Huneck and his wife.  It is acres of off-leash trails for people to bring their dogs.

Chapel at Dog Mountain, near St Johnsbury, VT

There also is a Dog Chapel, for people to reflect and remember their deceased furry friends.

Dog Chapel sign, near St Johnsbury, VT

The sign points out, in so many words, that it is non-denominational.

Dog Chapel interior, near St Johnsbury, VT

The chapel is filled with messages and pictures of peoples dogs, along with some of Huneck’s artwork.

Stained glass windows in Dog Chapel, near St Johnsbury, VT

The stained glass windows were all dog-themed, of course.  🙂

Gallery at Dog Mountain, near St Johnsbury, VT

Huneck’s studio and gift shop was full of his work, also.  Diana was familiar with his children’s books, so she was excited to see the place that inspires him.  Dog Mountain was a very enjoyable place to hang out for a bit!

Next up was the St. Johnsbury Athenaeum.

Public library and art gallery in St Johnsbury, VT

What is that, you ask?  Well, besides being a pretty old building, it is a public library and art gallery.  It was donated to the city in 1871 by Horace Fairbanks, heir to the Fairbanks Scale fortune.  Those scales are still made today.

Interior of library in St Johnsbury, VT

While the art gallery was closed for renovation, the building was a work of art itself!

The last place we visited that day was the Fairbanks Museum and Planetarium.

Museum and planetarium in St Johnsbury, VT

This building was also donated by the Fairbanks family, along with many of the objects in it.  Our Museum of the Rockies membership and it’s ASTC reciprocal agreement gave us free admission.  We paid extra to see the planetarium, as it just happened to be the solstice!  Our presenter, Bobby, was a hoot.  Imagine giving the late Robin Williams the controls to the star machine and you get the picture.  🙂

The next day, our truck was ready.  They found a technical service bulletin on it that pointed to a programming issue, so they reprogrammed the computer.  They also did several other things that they had discovered, unrelated to the engine problems.  We decided to stay one more night and give the truck a good test run without the trailer attached.  About 20 miles away was the town of Cabot, Vt…home to Cabot Creamery.

Cabot Creamery, Cabot, VT

Nothing like a test drive combined with cheese sampling!  We had a very enjoyable visit, picking up some cheese, preserves and cool t-shirts to boot!  We are happy to report that the truck did just fine.

On the 23rd…a day late, we headed to Rutland to meet up with Philip and Marlene, and their children Miles and Leah.  Before heading to their place, we set up our rig at a Harvest Hosts location, Autumn Mountain Winery and Cabins.   Philip and Marlene own Same Sun of Vermont, a design and installation company that deals in residential and commercial solar-electric systems.  They took us to show us their office in downtown Rutland in their Chevy Bolt.  Talk about a fast car…it does 0 to 60 in 6.3 seconds!  Their offices were beautiful, and they have a huge list of satisfied customers.  🙂  We went to dinner afterwards and got caught up on each other’s lives.

Philip and Marlene

Thank you Philip and Marlene for a wonderful evening!

Oh, and the truck ran like a champ all the way to Rutland.  🙂

Next up, we head over to New York State and the Adirondack Mountains.  Be sure to see our next post for what we find over there.  Until then safe and happy travels to all!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Acadia 2018 – Week Two

June 9-13, 2018 – Acadia National Park, Maine

Our second week at Acadia brought us more beautiful weather, so we made sure to take advantage of it.  Quite honestly, we had no idea what to expect for early June when we booked our reservations earlier this year.  We were pleasantly surprised, to say the least!

On June 9, we headed to Gorham Mountain.  This trail is the first in a series of trails leading to the peaks in the southeastern part of the park.

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We didn’t have to climb very far for the views to open up.  This view looks south towards Otter Point.

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Diana spotted this beautiful buck as he crossed the trail ahead of us.

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And here is the summit!

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Back in the 1990’s, we continued on to the next peak (Champlain Mountain) from this point with our golden retrievers, Kate and Dakota.  In between, we dropped down to a small mountain lake called The Bowl where they enjoyed swimming.  Then we retraced our steps back to the car. That was a full day!  While this day wasn’t near as long, it was still a challenging climb.  On our way back down, we met an ornithologist who works in the park.  We were able to interview him right on the trail to fulfill our junior ranger requirements!  His favorite thing in Acadia?  Birds.  🙂

On June 10, we thought we would give ourselves a little break, so we went to the Abbe Museum in Bar Harbor.  This is actually a second location for them, with the first being within Acadia National Park boundaries.  Founded in 1926 by Dr. Robert Abbe, a prominent New York physician, this affiliate of the Smithsonian Institute showcases the Native American people of the region.

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The area is unique in that several tribes banded together in order to better deal with the incoming European settlers.  They called themselves Wabanaki.  It is interesting that their tribal boundaries don’t coincide with the international boundaries, so that presents a whole host of challenges even to this day.

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One of the things we found fascinating was their collection of root clubs.  These were carved from the lower portion of small trees.

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And while they are intricate and quite beautiful, one has to think how much it would hurt to get a clunk on the head from one of these!

From Abbe Museum, we went to Thuya Gardens in Northeast Harbor.  To get there, we had to climb Asticou Terraces, a 200 foot high path sculpted into the side of Juniper Hill.

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From the top, a commanding view of Northeast Harbor can be seen.  It is considered a pleasure harbor, even though there are a number of lobster boats here.

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Set back from the terraces is Thuya Lodge, the summer home of Joseph H. Curtis.  He was a Boston-based landscape architect.  He designed the terraces after finishing the home in 1916.  The interior is much the way it was when he died in 1928, including the furnishings.  The gardens that now sit behind the home were actually an apple orchard he had planted.  His friend Charles Savage completed the gardens at a later date.

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This is the lone surviving apple tree from the Curtis orchard.

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Not a lot was currently in bloom, but the space was peaceful and green.

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Definitely a nice place to spend a little time.

Next, we visited one of Savage’s other creations, Asticou Gardens.

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It sits down at road level, not far from the Asticou Terraces.

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There was a lot more in bloom down there!

June 11 started out rainy, so after taking care of paperwork at home, we went down to the Bar Harbor waterfront and ate dinner at Geddy’s.  We noticed that they had some gluten free offerings on their sign out front, so that was what attracted us.  Imagine my surprise when the waiter told us that all their fryers and breading were gluten-free (made with rice and other flours instead of wheat, barley and rye), as it was just easier for them to do that than to have to be careful about cross contamination.

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That is the first deep fried fish I’ve had since 2011…and it was outstanding!  Washed down with an Omission GF lager, of course!  Note:  We came back later in the week to try their pizza.  Pat’s…another pizza joint in town… is better and FAR cheaper.

June 12 brought us another new Acadia experience.  All the years we’ve been coming here, we had no idea that the park has a bona fide waterfall.  We set out on John D. Rockefeller’s carriage roads to find it.

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This is the bridge that spans the creek below the falls.

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Climbing down into the creekbed, you are able to see how Rockefeller had the arch built off-perpendicular to the roadway.

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His reasoning was so that the arch itself framed the cascade.  While it wasn’t flowing much, it still was beautiful.

Instead of retracing our steps down the carriage road, we opted to take the trail that runs along the creek bed.

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Plenty of tree roots, rocks, ferns, pine needles and the forest scent that we love so much.  We did not see another soul on this trail.  🙂

When we returned to the car, we drove to the Abbe Museum location that is in the park.  Our admission for both locations was covered by our North American Reciprocal Museum membership.

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This is one of only two independent trail-side museums in the national parks.  The other is at Glacier Point in Yosemite National Park. This location opened in 1928.

On June 13, we decided to go see Thunder Hole, the chasm that rumbles and sprays seawater everywhere when conditions are right.  We knew there was a strong southerly wind, so there was a chance we would be in luck.  For reference, Thunder Hole is on the southeast shore of Mount Desert Island.

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This is so typical of what most tourists think of Acadia.  Buses pull up bringing throngs of people off of the cruise ships to see a few attractions.  Conditions weren’t right, so Thunder Hole was quiet…yet these folks all were waiting for something to happen.  I could see off in the distance across the bay that waves were breaking on Schoodic Peninsula’s southwest shore.   So off we went for Otter Point, just to the south of Thunder Hole.

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As we’ve so often found, a short distance can bring solitude at Acadia.  Those buses are about a quarter mile back around to the left.  🙂

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The farther west we walked, the bigger the surf was.

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This trail is called Ocean Path, and it has quite a few elevation changes.

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And there is what we came for!  We love to see that water splashing up off the Maine coast.  🙂

That wraps up our time heading up the Eastern Seaboard.  Next up, we head inland towards New Hampshire.  That turns into more of an adventure than we bargained for, so be sure to stop by for our next installment to see what happened.  Until then, safe and happy travels!

 

 

 

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